Front page of Frontdoors news

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Sr. Joan Fitzgerald, who is celebrating her 50th year at Xavier, made the cover of Frontdoors magazine. She's seen here accepting the Guardian of Hope Award in 2010.
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Sr. Joan Fitzgerald made the cover of Frontdoors, a news magazine that “celebrates and perpetuates the legacy of philanthropy and community leadership,” according to its website.

Slugged “Teaching points” on the cover, the eight-page spread talks about the history of the Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Sr. Joan's 50 years at Xavier, campus life and the school's new chapel, which is part of a new Founders Hall.

The magazine also has a brutally honest letter from the publisher on her daughter's time in Catholic school.

The magazine's website also touts “A Note from the Irish,” which posts a press release about St. Mary's pending trip to Ireland. Through Phoenix's Sister Cities program, the band was invited there to march in its St. Patrick's Day Parade and is amid fundraising for the trip.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Sr. Joan teaches “Community leadership.” Nothing in the article says she teaches the students to be a devout Catholics and to live a holy life. The girls are learning to be “Not afraid of being smart.” Where is that an issue? Almost 60% of college grads are girls. Priests wear a roman collar, why isn’t she wearing a nun’s habit? What’s going on at Xavier anyway? JO

    • Frontdoors Magazine isn’t a religious publication, it’s a magazine dedicated to “the legacy of philanthropy as well as community leadership” in the Valley. That’s why the article is focused on “community leadership”.

      To your other point, “being smart” isn’t necessarily the “cool” thing to be in many high schools. Being smart and working hard on academics are not always celebrated by high schoolers.That’s why its a big deal that Xavier girls embrace academics the way they do.

      Also, some religious orders still wear habits. More importantly, however, what the sisters wear doesn’t change the good works they’re doing in the school.

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