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Pope Francis makes cover of ‘Rolling Stone’

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Pope Francis looks on during his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Nov. 13. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Pope Francis looks on during his general audience in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican Nov. 13. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Last month he made the cover of Time magazine as its “Person of the Year.” Next up for Pope Francis: Rolling Stone.

Since the papal election, attendance at papal events in the Vatican have tripled to 6.6 million people, Binelli reports. Through quotations from Vatican experts and an engaging biography that shows how the pope struggled through dark times to emerge as the frontrunner for papacy, Rolling Stone presents the pope as a man tied to religious tradition on one hand and fighting to bring the church into a new era with the other. As the cover suggests, “The times, they are a-changin’.”

Look for the new issue of Rolling Stone to hit newsstands Friday. Read the cover story here.

1 COMMENT

  1. I’m sure many Catholics are excited that Pope Francis made the cover of a ‘hip’ magazine like ‘Rolling Stone’, but why? Mark Binelli may be a fan of the Holy Father this week, but doesn’t mean he won’t turn next week.
    Binelli’s compliments are odd at best. He says the pope is dressed “Surprisingly stylish, today wearing a double-breasted white overcoat, white scarf and slightly creamier cassock, all impeccably tailored.” That “Francis, like Bill Clinton, thrives on personal contact.” That’s a compliment? He “Thrives on personal contact” like Bill Clinton? Then he leaves an impression the Pope is going to lighten up on “Gay marriage, birth control and abortion”.

    The writer does not like Pope Benedict. He refers to him as a “Dour academic’, and says he belongs in the Popes “rogues’ gallery”. Then he goes on to say, “After the disastrous papacy of Benedict, a staunch traditionalist who looked like he should be wearing a striped shirt with knife-fingered gloves and menacing teenagers in their nightmares…”

    Pope Benedict isn’t alone. Binelli doesn’t seem to have much use for Cardinal Raymond Burke, Opus Dei, and Catholic Republicans. He also believes the Vatican is an “Arcane throwback of an institution”, and it is run like a “Medieval court”.

    If I were editor of a Catholic Newspaper I’d only link this article with an Explanatory Editorial.

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