Pope heads to Bosnia as ‘brother messenger of peace’

Muslims carry coffins containing the remains of their relatives during a May 12 mass funeral in the town of Bratunac, Bosnia-Herzegovina, for victims of the 1992-95 war. Pope Francis said he will dedicate his June 6 visit to Bosnia-Herzegovina to encouraging a minority Catholic community in the faith, fostering ecumenical and interreligious dialogue, and calling for peace and harmony after the devastations of war. (CNS photo/Dado Ruvic‚ Reuters)
Muslims carry coffins containing the remains of their relatives during a May 12 mass funeral in the town of Bratunac, Bosnia-Herzegovina, for victims of the 1992-95 war. Pope Francis said he will dedicate his June 6 visit to Bosnia-Herzegovina to encouraging a minority Catholic community in the faith, fostering ecumenical and interreligious dialogue, and calling for peace and harmony after the devastations of war. (CNS photo/Dado Ruvic‚ Reuters)

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Pope Francis said he will dedicate his one-day visit to Bosnia-Herzegovina to encouraging a minority Catholic community in the faith, fostering ecumenical and interreligious dialogue, and calling for peace and harmony after the devastations of war.

Bosnian woodcarver-sculptor Edin Hajderovac works on a chair for Pope Francis at his workshop in Zavidovici, Bosnia- Herzegovina, May 25. He and his father, Salem Hajderovac, are putting the finishing touches to the chair made from walnut trees, which Pope Francis will use during his visit to Sarajevo. The father and son, both devoted Muslims, initiated the project in the belief that it will reflect the message of peace that the Catholic Church's top leader will bring to Bosnia. (CNS photo/Dado Ruvic, Reuters)
Bosnian woodcarver-sculptor Edin Hajderovac works on a chair for Pope Francis at his workshop in Zavidovici, Bosnia- Herzegovina, May 25. He and his father, Salem Hajderovac, are putting the finishing touches to the chair made from walnut trees, which Pope Francis will use during his visit to Sarajevo. The father and son, both devoted Muslims, initiated the project in the belief that it will reflect the message of peace that the Catholic Church’s top leader will bring to Bosnia. (CNS photo/Dado Ruvic, Reuters)

He said he would be coming “as a brother messenger of peace to express to everyone — everyone — my esteem and friendship. I would like to proclaim to each person, each family, each community, God’s mercy, tenderness and love.”

The pope made his comments in a brief recorded video message sent to the Balkan nation ahead of his trip to the capital of Sarajevo June 6.

Twenty years after the end of a three-year conflict of war and ethnic cleansing, Bosnia-Herzegovina is still largely divided along ethnic lines. Bosnians make up 48 percent of the country’s nearly 4 million people, while Serbs make up 37 percent and Croats 14 percent. About 40 percent of all citizens are Muslim, 31 percent Orthodox and 15 percent Catholic.

In his video message, released June 2, Pope Francis said the aim of the trip was to confirm the nation’s Catholics in the faith, “support ecumenical and interreligious dialogue and above all to encourage the peaceful coexistence in your country.”

People walk outside the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in late April in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Pope Francis will meet with priests, religious and seminarians at the capital's cathedral during his June 6 trip to Sarajevo. (CNS photo/Fehim Demir, EPA)
People walk outside the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in late April in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. Pope Francis will meet with priests, religious and seminarians at the capital’s cathedral during his June 6 trip to Sarajevo. (CNS photo/Fehim Demir, EPA)

He said he hoped his visit would have a positive impact on society and on the Catholic community, which has seen the loss of about half of its members since the war because of mass immigration due to the conflict and lingering economic difficulties, as well as because of declining birthrates.

While expressing his “affection and my strong spiritual closeness” to all the people of Bosnia-Herzegovina, the pope encourage its Catholics “to be at the side of your fellow citizens as witnesses of faith and God’s love, working for a society that journeys toward peace in harmony and mutual collaboration.”

It will be Pope Francis’ eighth trip abroad and the 11th country he has visited outside of Italy since his election in 2013.

By Carol Glatz, Catholic News Service.

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Periphery pope: Bosnia trip aims to build bridges in divided nation (CNS/St. Louis Review)

Clash of faiths: Fractured by centuries of war, some Bosnians seek peace (The Catholic Sun)

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