Double grants bring Aging in Place education to the masses

Family caregivers, who are often thrust into their role, can easily remain there undetected and unsupported. The same goes for the elderly striving to remain independent despite health or mobility issues.

A senior woman sits with her doctor. The Foundation for Senior Living can help provide home health care services and resources to help individuals age in place. (courtesy photo)
A senior woman sits with her doctor. The Foundation for Senior Living can help provide home health care services and resources to help individuals age in place. (courtesy photo)

A pair of grants aims to change that by boosting the Foundation for Senior Living’s “Aging in Place” educational program. The combined $60,000 gift from the BHHS Legacy Foundation and an anonymous Catholic foundation supported the hiring and training of a community engagement specialist, Bevin Page, to oversee such efforts.

Empowering family caregivers

  • self-care tips for the caregiver
  • caregiving techniques and demonstrations
  • paying for care
  • avoiding scams, fraud and abuse

For more information or to schedule a presentation, call Bevin Page at (602) 285-0505 x167 or e-mail bpage@fsl.org.

Her free community presentations are also mobile. They’re suitable for churches, community groups, organizations and even family caregivers still in the workplace.

FSL leaders hope employers consider inviting them in for an hour-long presentation during lunch breaks. U.S. businesses reportedly lose billions each year in lost productivity from full-time caregiving employees. According to AARP, some 58 percent of family caregivers balance work with their caregiving role.

FSL’s presentations focus on self-care tips for the caregiver, caregiving techniques and demonstrations, paying for care plus avoiding scams, fraud and abuse.

“FSL provides many services that can directly help caregivers,” Page said, noting its caregiver workshops, respite care, home health care and adult day health centers. “Additionally, we can connect them to other resources they may need. With support from BHHS Legacy we’re going to be able to expand our services, reach more people, and lessen the burden of caregiving. We’re so grateful for their commitment to our mission.”

Community presentations like this one are free and can come to churches, workplaces and community groups to help individuals and caregivers learn about services and resources available to elderly and disabled individuals. (courtesy photo)
Community presentations like this one are free and can come to churches, workplaces and community groups to help individuals and caregivers learn about services and resources available to elderly and disabled individuals. (courtesy photo)

FSL expects to reach 1,500 individuals through this new educational program in the first year.

“They’re already stressed. In a lot of situations, they’re taking care of their own children” plus a parent or spouse, explained Tom Egan, president and CEO of FSL.

He expects the renewed outreach to ease that burden. In less than two years at the helm of FSL, Egan already lost track of how many people said to him, “I drive by your building all the time. I wish I knew what you did when I was going through this with my mom or dad.”

(courtesy photo)
(courtesy photo)

“Caregivers don’t self-identify. They’re bearing that burden by themselves,” Egan said, noting that 17 percent of all U.S. adults can claim the title.

FSL wants to jump in to help like Veronica or Simon did on the way to Calvary.

FSL has a long history of helping families with health, hunger, aging illness, loneliness, substandard housing and any other services a person might need for a quality life.

Related

Resource and Relaxation Retreat for caregivers Nov. 2

Australian bishops urge faithful to reject ageism (Catholic Herald)

Social justice in an ageing society (Sydney Catholic)