http://www.phoenixcatholicmedia.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/BH-7-13-15.mp3 On July 19, Auxiliary Bishop Eduardo A. Nevares ­celebrates his fifth anniversary serving in the Diocese of Phoenix. Bishop Nevares was ordained a priest for the Missionaries of Our Lady of La Salette July 18, 1981, and was incardinated...
There haven’t been many years of Harry A. Plummer’s adult life that didn’t circle around a Catholic school. None of it has been outside the Church.
James Lackey will be the first to tell you he has not suffered injustice. And yet, as he responds to detailed questions about how he grew up and came to be a leader in the Black Catholic community, it becomes apparent: this is a man who has borne wrongs patiently.
Claretian Father Darrin Merlino was baptized a Catholic but not raised as one. It wasn't until young adulthood that that he nonchalantly prayed, "Whatever Your will is for me, God."
Nestled at the foot of Camelback Mountain, the Mount Claret Retreat Center stands as oasis of sorts in the midst of a bustling city. Tom McGuire, the new director of the facility, is hoping more and more Catholics will seek God’s presence there.
There’s no telling what a lunchtime meeting twice per month can do for the soul. The impact on those they pray for during that meeting — their top agenda item — is equally immeasurable. The main order of business: pray for and network with priests, religious and those in discernment.
Six years ago, Bernie Capulong thought he had it all. Then came the crash of 2008. It was after he lost almost everything that God showed him life isn’t about money.
“I’ve met so many kids who have no idea what a true family or a true parent is. It’s so sad they don’t understand that,” Mark said.
To the uninformed, admonishing the sinner may sound like a holier-than-thou Pharisee casting judgement, but in reality, it involves an awareness of one’s own brokenness and need of repentance. It’s about lovingly calling someone to conversion, encouraging those who are trying to break free from sin and addiction.
SCOTTSDALE — Growing up in a strict German Lutheran family, Fr. Doug Lorig got the impression that God was someone angry. Paradoxically, amid messages of condemnation and wrath, he was told that God is love.