‘Terrible loss of life’ at Navy Yard shocking and sad, says archbishop

0
A U.S. flag flies at half staff at the White House Sept. 16 in remembrance of victims of a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard that day. At least 13 people were killed, including gunman Aaron Alexis, and eight others wounded when Alexis opened fire at t he Naval Sea Systems Command headquarters, authorities said. (CNS photo/Yuri Gripas, Reuters)
A U.S. flag flies at half staff at the White House Sept. 16 in remembrance of victims of a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard that day. At least 13 people were killed, including gunman Aaron Alexis, and eight others wounded when Alexis opened fire at t he Naval Sea Systems Command headquarters, authorities said. (CNS photo/Yuri Gripas, Reuters)
A U.S. flag flies at half staff at the White House Sept. 16 in remembrance of victims of a shooting at the Washington Navy Yard that day. At least 13 people were killed, including gunman Aaron Alexis, and eight others wounded when Alexis opened fire at t he Naval Sea Systems Command headquarters, authorities said. (CNS photo/Yuri Gripas, Reuters)

WASHINGTON (CNS) — As military, police and federal investigators searched for answers as to why a lone gunman opened fired Sept. 16 at the Washington Navy Yard, killing 12 people and wounding at least eight more, religious leaders and public officials offered prayers for the victims and their families.

Washington Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl and Archbishop Timothy P. Broglio, who heads the Washington-based Archdiocese for the Military Services, both issued brief statements offering prayers for the victims and their families. The shooter was identified as Aaron Alexis, 34, who became the 13th victim when he died in a gun battle with police at the naval office building in the nation’s capital.

At first, law enforcement authorities thought there was a second shooter, but by the end of the day confirmed Alexis was the only gunman. According to news reports, Alexis was a former Navy reservist who received a “general discharge” from the service and had moved to the Washington area from Texas about a year ago. He worked for a military contractor and had security clearance at the Navy Yard. Archbishop Broglio said the “terrible loss of life” shocked and saddened him, particularly as it occurred at a familiar place where he has often visited and celebrated the Eucharist.

NO COMMENTS

Leave a Reply