Sr. Mary Claire Strasser teaches fifth- through eighth-grade social studies at Most Holy Trinity Catholic School. She grew up in a close-knit family on a dairy farm in Nashville. The Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity (SOLT) community she belongs to was founded in 1958 as a Society of Apostolic Life and is composed of priests, brothers, sisters and laity living as disciples of Jesus through Mary.
By the world’s standards, Cristofer Pereyra was doing well. He’d emigrated from Peru at age 15, graduated from college and landed a good job, working as a reporter at Channel 33, the Phoenix affiliate of Univision, the Spanish-language television network.
Craig Colson has spent most of the last 20 years inside Catholic churches. It wasn’t always like that though. Growing up he dreaded going to church. Mostly, he said, it was the music he abhorred.
Rosemary Dougherty credits her 12 years of Catholic education and the strong faith and family bonds nurtured in her first-generation Italian American home for helping her weather the storms of life.
With his ordination to the priesthood June 3, Fr. Athanasius Fornwalt, FHS, marked a major milestone for himself and his community: he was the first of the Franciscan Friars of the Holy Spirit to be ordained a priest.
If you're among the 60,000 people who tune in each Sunday for the live broadcast of the Catholic Mass, you are undoubtedly familiar with "Catholics Matter," the weekly interview program that airs each Sunday following the 9 a.m. Mass.
Francesca Thomas has been working with little kids since she first graduated from college. “I went to church pretty faithfully, but I don’t think my faith was particularly deep at that time. I sort of went, doing what you’re supposed to do, but I really was captivated by this whole putting-your-faith-into-action thing,” Thomas said.
SCOTTSDALE — Growing up in a strict German Lutheran family, Fr. Doug Lorig got the impression that God was someone angry. Paradoxically, amid messages of condemnation and wrath, he was told that God is love.
When you turn onto their quiet street in East Mesa, you can spot the Briseño family’s house right away: it’s the one with the 15-passenger van parked in the driveway.
There’s no telling what a lunchtime meeting twice per month can do for the soul. The impact on those they pray for during that meeting — their top agenda item — is equally immeasurable. The main order of business: pray for and network with priests, religious and those in discernment.